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Need to Belong Scale

The need to belong is one of the most fundamental and well-researched human motives. The need to belong is a‘‘strong desire to form and maintain enduring interpersonal attachments.’’ Researchers contend that this need can account for much of the research on interpersonal behavior. This Need to Belong Scale is the most recent and empirically sound of the current need to belong measures.

Author of Tool: 
Leary, M. R.

Drive for Muscularity Scale (DMS)

The Drive for Muscularity (DM) represents an individual's perception that he or she is not muscular enough and that bulk should be added to his or her body frame, in the form of muscle mass (irrespective of a person's percentage of actual muscle mass or body fat). DM is more prevalent in men, where past research has shown that a muscular mesomorphic body shape is considered to be more desirable than any other. However, recent research has shown that women also tend to show fairly high levels of DM, suggesting that this concept may be important for them too (but perhaps in different ways...

Author of Tool: 
McCreary, D. R.

Dark Triad of Personality (D3-Short)

Paulhus and Williams (2002) called attention to the ‘Dark Triad’, a constellation of three conceptually distinct but empirically overlapping personality variables. The three triad members - machiavellianism, narcissism and subclinical psychopathy, often show differential correlates but share a common callousness.  To tease apart the triad members, Paulhus and Williams (2002) initiated a program of research to evaluate the degree of distinctiveness of the Dark Triad, both conceptually and empirically.  That initial work has stimulated many others to conduct their own research, as is evident...

Author of Tool: 
Paulhus, D. L

Vancouver Index of Acculturation (VIA)

The culture in which people live plays an important role in shaping their sense of self. Indeed, one facet of people's self-identity is that they belong to a certain cultural group. Thus, they have a sense of themselves as being, for example, Canadian, American, or Chinese. When an individual moves from one culture 
to another, many aspects of self-identity are modified to accommodate information about and experiences within the new culture. This process, generally referred to as acculturation, involves changes that take place as a result of continuous and direct contact...

Author of Tool: 
Paulhus, D. L

Berkeley Expressivity Questionnaire

Emotions help us respond adaptively to environmental challenges and opportunities. Unlike other biologically based response tendencies, such as reflexes, however, emotions only incline us to act in certain ways; they do not compel us to do so. This means that we may deny expression to some emotional impulses while freely expressing others. Striking individual differences in ex-pressivity suggest that people differ in their response tendencies and in how they express these impulses as they arise. The Berkeley Expressivity Questionnaire assesses three different facets of emotional...

Author of Tool: 
Gross, J.J., & John, O.P.

Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS)

The pressures placed on young men and women to portray an ideal physique are predominant social forces in today’s society. A failure to live up to these standards, whether real or imagined, may induce thoughts and feelings that others are negatively evaluating one’s physique. In this case, social physique anxiety may be experienced (SPA; Hart, Leary, & Rejeski, 1989). Subsequently, individuals who are concerned that others are or may be judging their physiques negatively (i.e., SPA) may feel pressured by society’s ideals to engage in physical activity to enhance their physique and...

Author of Tool: 
Leary, M. R.

Imposterism Scale

The impostor phenomenon refers to people who are objectively competent but feel the opposite and therefore fear being unmasked. In light of the strength and pervasiveness of the self-esteem motive, the impostor phenomenon presents an enigma because so-called impostors appear to lack this fundamental tendency for self-enhancement. According to previous work, impostors experience discomfort when they succeed, attribute their successes to factors other than their ability, and deny they are as competent as their behavior seems to indicate (Clance, 1985; Clance & Imes, 1978; Harvey &...

Author of Tool: 
Leary, M. R.

College Activities and Behaviors Questionnaire (CABQ)

The College Activities and Behaviors Questionnaire (CABQ) is a 22-item self-report measure that asks about the number of times students engaged in various activities during the previous week. Only seven items, which targeted sleep behaviors, interpersonal interactions, physical health, and journaling, were used . These items were chosen, as they seemed to be particularly important areas of functioning for depression-vulnerable individuals, and allowed for the examination of journaling behaviors following the writing intervention. 

Author of Tool: 
Pennebaker, J.W

Questionnaires from a Typical Writing Study

These questionnaires ask a series of questions relating to college experience. In the Pennebaker, J.W., Colder, M., & Sharp, L.K. (1990) study, participants were told  "During today's session, I want you to let go and write about your very deepest thoughts and feelings about coming to college. College, as you know, is a major transition. In your writing, you might want to write about your emotions and thoughts about leaving your friends or your parents, about issues of adjusting to the various aspects of college such as roommates, classes, or thoughts about your future, or even about...

Author of Tool: 
Pennebaker, J.W

Self-Consciousness Scale--(SCS-R)

Private self-consciousness is a tendency to introspect and examine one's inner self and feelings. Public self-consciousness is an awareness of the self as it is viewed by others. This kind of self-consciousness can result in self-monitoring and social anxiety. Both private and public self-consciousness are viewed as personality traits that are relatively stable over time, but they are not correlated. Just because an individual is high on one dimension doesn't mean that he or she is high on the other. Self-consciousness can strongly influence behaviour. As well as public and private self-...

Author of Tool: 
Scheier, M. F., & Carver, C. S.

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