Search database

Naval Aviator Human Factors Questionnaire

 

The civilian aviation centric Cockpit Management Attitude Questionnaire ( CMAQ; Gregorich et al., 1990)  was adapted for naval aviation. It was necessary to change some of the language to ensure that it would make sense to naval aviators. A draft questionnaire was distributed to a group of 20 experienced naval aviators for comment. The comments from these aviators were used to develop the Naval Aviator Human Factors (NAHF) questionnaire. The NAHF consisted of 31 questions pertaining to five categories:

  • My stress: 6 items. This scale emphasizes the consideration of- and...

Author of Tool: 
O’Connor, Jones, McCauley, & Buttrey

The Controlling Pain Vignettes Survey (CPVS)

Nurses are forced to make difficult decisions when presented with patients who are experiencing pain. Ethical dilemmas can also arise around issues such over-medication, under-medication, and opioid side effects to name a few. It is important to gain an understanding of how nurses make these decisions so that more insight can be gained into the factors influencing those decision making processes. This survey is the product of four separate studies, each investigating one specific factor which may be influential during nurses’ assessments of patient pain.

Author of Tool: 
McCaffery, M., Ferrell, B. R., & O'Neil-Page, E.

Acceptance of Modern Myths About Sexual Aggression (AMMSA) scale

Although the construct was introduced during the era of second wave feminism, it was not until 1980 that Martha Burt published the first social scientific examination of rape myth acceptance.This scale design began with the standard definition that rape myths are ‘descriptive or prescriptive beliefs about rape … that serve to deny, downplay or justify sexual violence that men commit against women’ In rape myth methodology prior to the Acceptance of Modern Myths about Sexual Aggression (AMMSA), a minimum stipulation was that rape myths needed to be demonstrably false. Significantly however...

Author of Tool: 
Gerger, H., Kley, H., Bohner G., Siebler, F.

Appearance-based Rejection Sensitivity (Appearance-RS) Scale (Long and Short Form)

Appearance-based Rejection Sensitivity (Appearance-RS) reflects a personality processing system characterized by anxious concerns and expectations about being rejected based on one’s physical attractiveness (Park, 2007). People differ in their sensitivity to rejection based on appearance with unique consequences for mental and physical health, affect, and feelings of belonging. Specifically, Appearance-RS predicts increased symptoms of eating disorders and the tendency to make appearance-based comparisons with others. People high in Appearance-RS who are reminded of a negative aspect of...

Author of Tool: 
Park, L. E.

HIV & Safer Sex: Self Efficacy Scale

Safer sex is first defined for participants as any combination of the following behavioral strategies:

A) Abstinence from vaginal and anal intercourse.

B) Condom Use with all vaginal and anal sexual partners.

C) Sexually exclusive relationship with only one partner in the past year who has tested negative for HIV antibodies.

Participants are then instructed to rate their level of confidence in having safer sex and temptation to have unprotected sex on a five-point Likert...

Author of Tool: 
Redding, C. & Rossi, J

Fear of Physician (FOP)

Many people are fearful and/or anxious about communicating with their physician. It is believed that this fear/anxiety is in some part a function of the way the physician communicates with the patient. This Fear of Physician (FOP) instrument was developed to measure that feeling. The FOP is an extension of the 5-item state anxiety measure developed by Spielberger (1966).

Author of Tool: 
Richmond, V. P., Smith, R. S., Heisel, A. M., & McCroskey, J. C.

Richmond Humour Assessment Instrument (RHAI)

The Richmond Humor Assessment Instrument (RHAI) is a 16-item self-report measure that uses a 5-point Likert format. The instrument was developed by Richmond (1999) to measure an individual's predisposition to reenact humour messages during an interaction. Researchers believe that teaching people to be humerous can help with stress and family problems, make them more popular, and they will have improved self-concepts.

Author of Tool: 
Richmond, V. P.

Willingness To Communicate (WTC)

The study of various general orientations toward communication has held an important place in communication research for over a half-century. This research has been conducted under a wide variety of conceptualizations. These have included stage fright, speech anxiety, communication apprehension, shyness, reticence, unwillingness to communicate, willingness to communicate, talkativeness, verbal activity, vocal activity, and a number of others. Although these are all related constructs, there are important distinctions among them. One group of constructs relates to anxiety or apprehension...

Author of Tool: 
McCroskey, J. C., & Richmond, V. P.

Tolerance for Disagreement Scale (TFD)

The Tolerance For Disagreement (TFD) Scale is designed to measure the degree to which an individual can tolerate other people disagreeing with what the individual believes to be true. This conceptualization is similar to that of argumentativeness. People with high argumentativeness are likely to be able to deal with more disagreement than those people who are low in argumentativeness. It is believed that conflict in interpersonal communication is in large part (in conjunction with the level of liking between the people) a function of the tolerance of disagreement of the interactants.

Author of Tool: 
Teven, J. J., Richmond, V. P., & McCroskey, J. C.

Source Credibility Measures

Measurement of source credibility has been a concern of the Communication discipline for over 40 years. The first multidimensional measure appeared in the Communication literature in 1966 (McCroskey, J .C., Scales for the measurement of ethos, Speech Monographs, 33, 65-72) and provided scales measuring competence and trustworthiness. Many other studies were conducted over the next 30 years. This Source Credibility Measure is the most complete measure and includes scales for three dimensions: competence, trustworthiness, and goodwill/caring. These are measures of constructs which are...

Author of Tool: 
McCroskey, J. C., & Teven, J. J.

Pages