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SECope: Coping with HIV Treatment Side Effects

Side effects from HIV treatments impact quality of life (QOL) and adherence to care, and influence decisions about health care. The SECope: Coping with HIV Treatment Side Effects Scale deals with the issue of the lack of data on how people deal with and manage the adverse effects of medication.    For example, how one copes with the undesirable effects of ART may be similar to how one deals with the symptoms of a chronic disease. There are fundamental differences, however, between coping with an ongoing disease and side effects from a treatment regimen. The individual taking medications,...

Author of Tool: 
Centre for AIDS Prevention Studies (CAPS)

Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale (ASES)

Adherence to HIV treatment, including adherence to antiretroviral (ART) medication regimens, is paramount in the management of HIV. Self-efficacy for treatment adherence has been identified as an important correlate of medication adherence in the treatment of HIV and other medical conditions. The Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale (ASES), which was designed to measure self-efficacy for adherence to HIV treatment plans, including but not limited to taking HIV medications. For the purposes of this scale, treatment plans can include anything the individual does to take care of hi/her HIV disease,...

Author of Tool: 
Centre for AIDS Prevention Studies (CAPS)

Modified Schedule of Sexist Events (SSE-LM)

The Modified Version of Sexual Events (SSE-LM) is a modified version of the Schedule of Sexual Events-Lifetime (SSE, Klonoff & Landrine, 1995 ), which additionally applies to women's HIV risk behaviours.

Author of Tool: 
Centre for AIDS Prevention Studies (CAPS)

Cohen-Hoberman Inventory of Physical Symptoms (CHIPS)

Evidence of an association between recent stressful life events and a variety of psychological and physical disorders has steadily been increasing. The Cohen-Hoberman Inventory of Physical Symptoms (CHIPS)  is a list of 39 commonn physical symptoms. Items were selected so as to exclude items of an obvious psychological nature. Each item is reated on a 5-point Likert scale for how much that item bothered or distressed the individual during the past two weeks.

Author of Tool: 
Cohen, S & Hoberman, H.

Partner Interaction Questionnaire (PIQ-20)

A number of studies have found that persons whose partners reportedly supported their efforts to quit smoking were more likely to quit smoking and maintain abstinence. Less clear, however, is what kinds of partner behaviours are helpful to quitters and what kinds are harmful. This lack of information about mediating behaviours may be responsible, in part, for the ineffectiveness of interventions designed to facilitate spouse/partner support for quitting smoking. Partner Interaction Questionnaire (PIQ-20) that includes separate subscales assessing positive and negative behaviours provided...

Author of Tool: 
Cohen, S.

Cancer Treatment Survey (CaTS)

People receiving cancer treatment commonly experience pre-treatment anxiety and report numerous distressing physical and psychosocial sequelae to treatment. Many feel anxious and fearful about the prospect of chemotherapy. High levels of clinically significant anxiety (47%) have been observed in women with early breast cancer about to commence adjuvant chemotherapy. Common physical sequelae to chemotherapy include nausea, fatigue, hair loss and predisposition to infection, while non-physical sequelae include treatment related anxiety, needle phobias and concerns about...

Author of Tool: 
Schofield, P.

Smoking Cessation by General Practitioners (SmoCess-GP)

Smoking is one of the most significant and preventable risk factors for cardiovascular and lung diseases. General practitioners (GPs) play an important role in the secondary prevention of smoking. The Smoking Cessation by General Practitioners (SmoCess-GP) was developed to assess the extent of smoking cessation activities by GP’s and to evaluate its effectiveness.

Author of Tool: 
Julia Jung, Melanie Neumann, Nicole Ernstmann, Holger Pfaff, Jürgen Wolf, Andrea Staratschek-Jox, Markus Wirtz

Worksite Health Promotion Capacity Instrument (WHPCI)

When seeking to assist those companies that have not yet established systematic worksite health promotion (WHP), the problem quickly encountered is that not all companies possess the same capacity for engaging in Worksite Health Promotion (WHP). Each company requires support tailored to their specific level of capacity. To determine each company’s particular situation in terms of their capacity to engage in WHP, the Worksite Health Promotion Capacity Instrument (WHPCI) was developed.

Author of Tool: 
Julia Jung, Holger Pfaff, Anika Nitzsche, Brigitte Stieler-Lorenz, Jürgen Wasem, Markus Wirtz

HIV & Safer Sex: Self Efficacy Scale

Safer sex is first defined for participants as any combination of the following behavioral strategies:

A) Abstinence from vaginal and anal intercourse.

B) Condom Use with all vaginal and anal sexual partners.

C) Sexually exclusive relationship with only one partner in the past year who has tested negative for HIV antibodies.

Participants are then instructed to rate their level of confidence in having safer sex and temptation to have unprotected sex on a five-point Likert...

Author of Tool: 
Redding, C. & Rossi, J

General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE)

The construct of Perceived Self-Efficacy reflects an optimistic self-belief (Schwarzer, 1992). This is the belief that one can perform a novel or difficult tasks, or cope with adversity -- in various domains of human functioning. Perceived self-efficacy facilitates goal-setting, effort investment, persistence in face of barriers and recovery from setbacks. It can be regarded as a positive resistance resource factor. Ten items from the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE) are designed to tap this construct. Each item refers to successful coping and implies an internal-stable attribution of...

Author of Tool: 
Ralf Schwarzer & Matthias Jerusalem

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