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Naval Aviator Human Factors Questionnaire

 

The civilian aviation centric Cockpit Management Attitude Questionnaire ( CMAQ; Gregorich et al., 1990)  was adapted for naval aviation. It was necessary to change some of the language to ensure that it would make sense to naval aviators. A draft questionnaire was distributed to a group of 20 experienced naval aviators for comment. The comments from these aviators were used to develop the Naval Aviator Human Factors (NAHF) questionnaire. The NAHF consisted of 31 questions pertaining to five categories:

  • My stress: 6 items. This scale emphasizes the consideration of- and...

Author of Tool: 
O’Connor, Jones, McCauley, & Buttrey

Nuclear Teamskills Taxonomy

 

The purpose  was to identify the team skills required by nuclear power plant operations team members. An initial domain familiarization consisted of a review of company documentation; observations in the control room, on-plant and in the simulator; and role interviews. In the second phase, Critical Incident Technique (CIT) interviews were carried out with 38 operations team members on three British nuclear power plants. A total of 314 statements concerned with teamworking skills were identified from the interview data and used to develop the nuclear team skills taxonomy. The...

Author of Tool: 
O'Connor, O'Dea, Flin

Nontechnical skills taxonomy for Officers of the Deck

The Officer of the Deck (OOD) of a U.S. Navy ship is in charge of the safe and proper operation of the ship, and accountable to the Commanding Officer for every event that occurs during his or her OOD watch. An initial set of 17 categories of nontechnical skills were identified from a literature review. A focus group with four qualified OODs used the skills identified from the literature review to develop an initial taxonomy of five categories, each with two or three corresponding behavioral elements. This taxonomy was then used to classify 149 statements concerned with the nontechnical...

Author of Tool: 
Long, O'Connor

Guernsey Community Participation and Leisure Assessment (GCPLA)

While The GCPLA is a checklist, it is intended to be used in a semi-structured interview format whereby the service user describes their experiences. If the service user has insufficient language then carers can be used as respondents. The GCPLA produces both quantitative and qualitative data for analysis.

The GCPLA was initially designed to support an individual planning system in the assessment and generation of community participation and leisure needs, and to monitor the outcomes of interventions designed to increase and enhance the individual service user's experience of...

Author of Tool: 
Baker, P. A.

Brief Family Distress Scale

Researchers and clinicians often require a quick assessment instrument to gauge the magnitude of distress or crisis experience in families. While excellent measures of stress and coping in families exist, we wanted to develop a measure that could quickly convey meaningful information about a families current crisis situation. The Brief Family Distress Scale (BFDS) was meant to be brief so that even families in severe distress could complete it. The response choices were derived from qualitative interviews with parents of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders or Intellectual...

Author of Tool: 
Jonathan A. Weiss; Yona Lunsky

The Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS)

The Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS) maps on DSM-IV criteria, and yields a PTSD aggregate score as well as scores on the re-experiencing, avoidance and hyperarousal subscales. The CPSS comprises 24-items, 17 of which correspond to the DSM-IV symptoms. In the first section, answers are on a Likert-type scale where 0 is not at all, 1 is once a week or less/once in a while, 2 is 2 to 4 times a week/half the time, and 3 is 5 or more times a week/almost always. In the second part of the questionnaire, respondents are asked about functional impairment, or how much the problems indicated in...

Author of Tool: 
Edna B. Foa, Ph.D.

Systematic Pedestrian and Cycling Environmental Scan (SPACES) Instrument

The Systematic Pedestrian and Cycling Environmental Scan (SPACES) Instrument is based on a study (Pikora et al., 2006) which collected information related to the physical environment in a 408-km2 area of metropolitan Perth. Hepburn Avenue, Lord Street Beechboro, Point Resolution and the coast form the borders for the area. Approximately 2,000 kilometres of road network were audited during February and March 2000 using SPACES. Some areas were audited twice to act as a quality control measure.

Author of Tool: 
Pikora, T., Giles-Corti, B., Bull, F., Knuiman, M., Jamrozik, K., Donovan, R.

Twin Cities Walking Survey

The Twin Cities Walking Survey was developed for a Round 2 Active Living Research grant in St. Paul, Minnesota, for which Ann Forsyth is the principal investigator. At the 2004 ALR conference, all round 2 grantees with projects focused on community and correlates of physical activity gathered for a meeting to discuss common measures. The Twin Cities Walking Study is the result of that discussion. Ann Forsyth’s crew led the effort to compile this instrument mostly because they were the first in the field. It takes approximately 45 minutes to complete the survey as an interview. Pilot...

Author of Tool: 
Kathryn H. Schmitz

Diagnostic Infant and Preschool Assessment (DIPA)

The Diagnostic Infant Preschool Assessment (DIPA) is intended as an interview for caregivers of children up to 6 years old. It is acknowledged that many of the symptoms are not possible for infants but many scripts were worded so that they could be applied to younger children and were not based on an a priori assumption that these symptoms could not be detected in younger children. Also, the DIPA should be easily extended for use with children older than 6 years. Each disorder is in a self-contained module. All of the symptoms needed to make a DSM-IV diagnosis are in a disorder module and...

Author of Tool: 
Michael S. Scheeringa, MD, MPH

Preschool PTSD Treatment (PPT)

The manual was created for use in a trial for 3-6 year-old children. Three years of age is about the lower limit at which children can understand and cooperate with CBT techniques. Use with children older than 6 years is possible with adaptations. PPT has similarities with Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Sexually Abused Preschool Children (CBT-SAP) (Cohen and Mannarino, 1996) and Trauma Focused Coping (TFC) for 8 to 18 year-old children (March and Amaya-Jackson, 1998).

Author of Tool: 
Michael S. Scheeringa, MD, MPH, Lisa Amaya-Jackson, MD, MPH, & Judith Cohen, MD

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