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Naval Aviator Human Factors Questionnaire

 

The civilian aviation centric Cockpit Management Attitude Questionnaire ( CMAQ; Gregorich et al., 1990)  was adapted for naval aviation. It was necessary to change some of the language to ensure that it would make sense to naval aviators. A draft questionnaire was distributed to a group of 20 experienced naval aviators for comment. The comments from these aviators were used to develop the Naval Aviator Human Factors (NAHF) questionnaire. The NAHF consisted of 31 questions pertaining to five categories:

  • My stress: 6 items. This scale emphasizes the consideration of- and...

Author of Tool: 
O’Connor, Jones, McCauley, & Buttrey

Nuclear Teamskills Taxonomy

 

The purpose  was to identify the team skills required by nuclear power plant operations team members. An initial domain familiarization consisted of a review of company documentation; observations in the control room, on-plant and in the simulator; and role interviews. In the second phase, Critical Incident Technique (CIT) interviews were carried out with 38 operations team members on three British nuclear power plants. A total of 314 statements concerned with teamworking skills were identified from the interview data and used to develop the nuclear team skills taxonomy. The...

Author of Tool: 
O'Connor, O'Dea, Flin

Nontechnical skills taxonomy for Officers of the Deck

The Officer of the Deck (OOD) of a U.S. Navy ship is in charge of the safe and proper operation of the ship, and accountable to the Commanding Officer for every event that occurs during his or her OOD watch. An initial set of 17 categories of nontechnical skills were identified from a literature review. A focus group with four qualified OODs used the skills identified from the literature review to develop an initial taxonomy of five categories, each with two or three corresponding behavioral elements. This taxonomy was then used to classify 149 statements concerned with the nontechnical...

Author of Tool: 
Long, O'Connor

NOTECHS Behavioural Marker System

 

The goal was to develop a feasible, efficient method for assessing an individual pilot’s nontechnical skills. After review of existing behavioural rating systems, the NOTECHS system was developed. NOTECHS consists of four categories, each with component elements of behaviour. NOTECHS was designed as: (i) A professional pragmatic tool for instructors and authorised examiners; (ii) A tool to be used by non-psychologists;   (iii) A tool using common professional aviation language, with the primary intention of debriefing pilots and communicating concrete directions for improvements...

Author of Tool: 
The JARTEL group

Road Maintenance Workers’ Perceptions of Safety Climate

This self-administered questionnaire has been used with truck drivers, operators of road scrapers, tractor drivers, wheel loader operators, and maintenance operators. The variables assessed include the attitudes of supervisors, the attitudes of coworkers, the respondent's own attitudes, the respondent's own actions, the effects of feedback, the effects of knowledge and instructions, the effects of manner of instructing, the effects of judgement and attentiveness, the impact of errors of others, and the importance of one's own professional skills.

Author of Tool: 
Niskanen, T.

Safety Climate for Road Workers and Supervisors

The questionnaire has been administered to both workers and supervisors in road maintenance, road and bridge construction, and central repair shops. It assesses safe work habits in production and performance, responsibility, indifference towards safety, individual communication, emphasizing cost-effectiveness or safety, and feedback. Extra items are provided for both supervisors and workers that assess giving and monitoring of instructions, clarity of instructions, safety inspections, diversity of work, importance of work, independence of work, discussions with workmates, personal...

Author of Tool: 
Niskanen, T.

Risk assessments and Safety Management in Workplaces

The questionnaire has been administered to both employers and workers. It solicits information on the employer/worker's company, the company's familiarity with the occupational safety and health (OSH) directive, the respondent's familiarity with OSH, whether the prerequisites for safe and healthy work are being met in the respondent's workplace, how safety management is being realised in their workplace, how OSH legislation has improved or changed safety practices in their workplace, how risk assessments are being carried out in their workplace, how the results of risk assessments are...

Author of Tool: 
Niskanen, T.

Risk assessment and safety compliance culture in the chemical industry

This questionnaire is suitable for administration to both employers and workers. It solicits information on the respondent's role in the company, the company's sub-branch of the chemical industry, whether chemicals are being used safely within the company, whether OSH directives are being followed, whether proactive measures are being used, whether retrospective data is being utilised, whether hazards within the workplace are being identified, how hazard and risk assessments are being carried out, how the results of risk assessments are being utilised, whether sufficient on-the-job...

Author of Tool: 
Niskanen, T.

Sense and Self-Regulation Checklist (SSC)

Comorbid symptoms are common in autism spectrum disorder are associated with increased autism severity. Comorbid symptoms include abnormal sensory responses, sleep disruption, gastrointestinal problems, self-injurious behaviours, aggression, and irritability. It is recommended that comorbid symptoms are identified and treated from the time of autism diagnosis.

The SSC was developed following extensive interviews of parents of children with autism about their child's sensory and self-regulatory responses to ordinary, daily-life situations. It contains six sensory subdomains (touch-...

Author of Tool: 
Silva, L. M. T., & Schalock, M.

The Maximizing Scale and The Regret Scale

As the number of options available to a person increases so too does the burden of choice. For individuals identified as maximizers, added options pose problems as the individual must consider each and attempt to determine which would lead to the best outcome. When a selection is made, maximizers often feel doubt or a lingering regret.

The maximizing scale contains thirteen items, each rated on a seven point scale from completely disagree to completely agree. These items assess whether a person tends to try and maximize their outcomes or whether they are a satisficer who simply...

Author of Tool: 
Schwartz, B., Ward, A., Monterosso, J., Lyubomirsky, S., White, K., & Lehman, D. R.

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