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Personal Report of Public Speaking Anxiety (PRPSA)

This measure was developed as a part of a continuing research program investigating the effects of systematic desensitization on communication apprehension. The Personal Report of Public Speaking Anxiety Scale (PRPSA)  is an excellent measure for research which centers on public speaking anxiety, but is an inadequate measure of the broader communication apprehension construct.

Author of Tool: 
McCroskey, J. C.

Shyness Scale (SS)

This Shyness Scale (SS) measure is also referred to as the McCroskey Shyness Scale. It was developed to obtain individual's self-report of their shy behavior. Unlike many shyness scales that have been developed in the field of Psychology, this scale does not confound communication apprehension  with shy behavior. These are two very different constructs and adding items from both provide an uninterpretable score. Communication apprehension relates to fear and/or anxiety about communicating. Willingness to Communicate (WTC) relates to an orientation to initiate communication. Shyness relates...

Author of Tool: 
McCroskey, J. C., & Richmond, V. P.

SocioCommunicative Style Scale (SCS)

Socio-communicative style refers to others' perception of a communicator's assertiveness and responsiveness behaviors. The SocioCommunicative Style Scale (SCS) is designed to measure the perceptions of these behaviors. Generally, these perceived behaviors are uncorrelated. These are two of the three components of the SCS construct. The third component is variously labeled as "versatility" or "flexibility." This third component is best measured by the "Cognitive Flexibility" scale.

Author of Tool: 
Richmond, V. P., & McCroskey, J. C.

SocioCommunicative Orientation Scale (SCO)

Sociocommunicative orientation refers to an individual's perception of how assertive and responsive he/she is. This Socio-Communicative Orientation Scale (SCO) is designed to measures these orientations. Generally, these orientations are either totally uncorrelated or only marginally correlated (r < .30). These are two of the three components of the SCO construct. The third component is variously labeled as "versatility" or "flexibility." This third component is best measured by the "Cognitive Flexibility" scale. 

Author of Tool: 
Richmond, V. P., & McCroskey, J. C.

Situational Communication Apprehension Measure (SCAM)

The Situational Communication Apprehension Measure (SCAM) was developed to provide and instrument which could measure state CA in any context. This is a self-report instrument which can apply to how a person felt in any recent communication event (the closer in time between the event and completion of this instrument, the more valid the measure will be).

Author of Tool: 
Richmond, V. P.

behavioral avoidance/inhibition (BIS/BAS) scales

Several theorists have argued that two general motivational systems underlie behavior. A behavioral approach system (BAS) is believed to regulate appetitive motives, in which the goal is to move toward something desired. A behavioral avoidance (or inhibition) system (BIS) is said to regulate aversive motives, in which the goal is to move away from something unpleasant.  We developed the BIS/BAS scales to assess individual differences in the sensitivity of these systems. The BIS/BAS scales are available for research and teaching applications.

Author of Tool: 
Carver, C. S., & White, T. L.

Measure of Attachment Qualities (MAQ)

The Measure of Attachment Qualities (MAQ) is a measure of adult attachment patterns.  It has separate scales to assess secure attachment tendencies and avoidant tendencies, and two scales reflecting aspects of the anxious-ambivalent pattern. This measure is based on four studies. Three studies relate self-reports of adult attachment qualities to broader aspects of personality. The pattern emerging from the studies indicates that avoidant attachment is inversely related to extraversion and to agreeableness but is relatively unrelated to manifest anxiety or neuroticism. Qualities of...

Author of Tool: 
Carver, C. S.

Curiosity and Exploration Inventory (CEI)

In an effort to expand research on curiosity, the authors elaborate on a theoretical model that informs research on the design of a new measure and the nomological network of curiosity. Curiosity was conceptualized as a positive emotional-motivational system associated with the recognition, pursuit, and self-regulation of novelty and challenge. The authors posit that curiosity is an important motivational component (but not the only one) that links cues reflecting novelty and challenge (internal or external) with growth opportunities. The Curiosity and Exploration Inventory (CEI)...

Author of Tool: 
Kashdan, T.B., Rose, P., & Fincham, F.D.

The Day Reconstruction Method (DRC)

The Day Reconstruction Method (DRM) assesses how people spend their time and how they experience the various activities and settings of their lives, combining features of time-budget measurement and experience sampling. Participants systematically reconstruct their activities and experiences of the preceding day with procedures designed to reduce recall biases. The benefits of the DRM as outlined by the authors are: joint assessment of activities and subjective experiences, information about the duration of each experience, allowing for duration weighted analyses of experiences, lower...

Author of Tool: 
Kahneman, D., Kreuger, A. B., & Schkade, D. A.

Derogation of Competitors Instrument

The purpose of the derogation of competitors instrument is to measure for the likelihood of persons to form derogation tactics for competitor. Verbal signals are sometimes used to manipulate the impressions that people form about oneself and others. For the goal of self-enhancement, one can manipulate impressions either by elevating oneself or derogating others. Five hypothesis about derogation of same sex competitors were generated from an evolutionary model of human-mate competition. These hypothesis focused on sex-differences in the importance that humans attach to external resources,...

Author of Tool: 
Buss, D.

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