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The IDEA: Inventory of the Dimensions of Emerging Adulthood

Arnett (2000) has proposed that the time of life roughly between ages 18-25 be considered a "distinct period" called emerging adulthood (EA). Essentially, this is a time when individuals tend to consider themselves too old to be adolescents, but not yet full-fledged adults. The Inventory of the Dimensions of Emerging Adulthood (IDEA) can be used to explore individual differences in self-identification with the processes of EA. Education of parents on the concept of EA could give parents added understanding of their children's life choices and delays in accomplishment of traditional adult...

Author of Tool: 
Reifman, A.

Sexual Behavior for Students at Public Middle Schools Questionnaire

The questionnaire included a large number of questions about sexuality, including questions on the following topics: existence of a boyfriend/girlfriend and age difference of that boy/girlfriend, knowledge about sexual topics, self-efficacy to avoid various sexual behaviors, norms about various sexual behaviors, perceptions of peer behaviors, opportunity to have sex, pressures to have sex, pre-coital sexual behaviors, various measures of sexual behavior, attempts to pressure someone else to have sex, and reasons to have and not to have sex. 

Author of Tool: 
Centre for AIDS Prevention Studies (CAPS)

Affective Learning and Teacher Evaluation

Experts in Educational Psychology have determined that there are three general categories of learning: Cognitive, Affective, and Psychomotor. The results of research in instructional communication suggests that instructor communication behavior may have its strongest impact on affective learning, although certainly impacting the other categories as well. Hence, measurement of affective learning has received considerable attention in this field. The first measures of affective learning in instructional communication research were developed in the 1970s. These evolved over a...

Author of Tool: 
McCroskey, J. C.

Classroom Anxiety Measure

The Classroom Anxiety Measure (CAM) is based on Richmond's Situational Communication Apprehension Measure developed by McCroskey and Richmond (1982, 1985) to measure state communication apprehension in any context.  

Author of Tool: 
Richmond, V. P.

The Multidimentional Model of Black Identity (MMBI)

The Multidimentional Model of Racial Identity (MMRI) defines racial identity as that part of the person's self-concept that is related to her/his membership within a race. It is concerned with both the significance the individual places on race in defining him/herself and the individual's interpretations of what it means to be Black.  The MMRI proposes four dimensions of racial identity in African Americans: the salience of identity; the centrality of the identity; the ideology associated with the identity; and the regard in which the person holds African Americans.  The first two...

Author of Tool: 
Sellers, R.

Aspects of Identity Questionnaire (AIQ-IV)

Identity orientations refer to the relative importance that individuals place on various identity attributes or characteristics when constructing their self-definitions (Cheek, 1989). The development of the Aspects of Identity Questionnaire (AIQ) began with the selection of items from Sampson's (1978) list of identity characteristics that were judged to represent the domains of personal and social identity (Cheek & Briggs, 1981, 1982). Subsequently, some items were reworded, others eliminated, and new items were developed to improve the reliability and content validity of the...

Author of Tool: 
Cheek, J. M. & Briggs, S. R.

Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale

A key proposition of cognitive– behavioral models of social anxiety (Clark & Wells, 1995; Rapee & Heimberg, 1997) is that social anxiety is, in part, a response to perceived negative evaluation by others. The construct of fear of negative evaluation consists of feelings of apprehension about others’ evaluations, distress over these negative evaluations, and the expectation that others will evaluate one negatively (Watson & Friend, 1969). This construct is distinct from, but closely related to, social anxiety. Specifically, fear of negative evaluation pertains to the sense of...

Author of Tool: 
Leary, M. R.

Need to Belong Scale

The need to belong is one of the most fundamental and well-researched human motives. The need to belong is a‘‘strong desire to form and maintain enduring interpersonal attachments.’’ Researchers contend that this need can account for much of the research on interpersonal behavior. This Need to Belong Scale is the most recent and empirically sound of the current need to belong measures.

Author of Tool: 
Leary, M. R.

Drive for Muscularity Scale (DMS)

The Drive for Muscularity (DM) represents an individual's perception that he or she is not muscular enough and that bulk should be added to his or her body frame, in the form of muscle mass (irrespective of a person's percentage of actual muscle mass or body fat). DM is more prevalent in men, where past research has shown that a muscular mesomorphic body shape is considered to be more desirable than any other. However, recent research has shown that women also tend to show fairly high levels of DM, suggesting that this concept may be important for them too (but perhaps in different ways...

Author of Tool: 
McCreary, D. R.

Dark Triad of Personality (D3-Short)

Paulhus and Williams (2002) called attention to the ‘Dark Triad’, a constellation of three conceptually distinct but empirically overlapping personality variables. The three triad members - machiavellianism, narcissism and subclinical psychopathy, often show differential correlates but share a common callousness.  To tease apart the triad members, Paulhus and Williams (2002) initiated a program of research to evaluate the degree of distinctiveness of the Dark Triad, both conceptually and empirically.  That initial work has stimulated many others to conduct their own research, as is evident...

Author of Tool: 
Paulhus, D. L

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