The Saint Louis University Mental Status (SLUMS)

By

Author of Tool: 

Tariq, S. H., Tumosa, N., Chibnall, J. T., Perry, M. H. 3rd., & Morley, J. E.

Key references: 

Kurlowicz, L., & Wallace, M. (1975). Mini-Mental State: A practical method for grading the cognitive state of patients for the clinician. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 12(3):189-198.

Tariq, S. H., Tumosa, N., Chibnall, J. T., Perry, M. H. 3rd., & Morley, J. E. (2006). Comparison of the Saint Louis University mental status examination and the mini-mental state examination for detecting dementia and mild neurocognitive disorder–a pilot study. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 14(11):900-10.

Primary use / Purpose: 

The Saint Louis University Mental Status (SLUMS) is an 11-item questionnaire with scores ranging from 0 to 30. It is designed to identify individuals with mild or early dementia (scores 21-26) through measuring orientation, memory, attention, and executive functions.

Background: 

The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) has been widely used in the detection of dementia since its development. However, the test performs poorly when identifying individuals with mild dementia. In a study by Tariq, Tumosa, Chibnall, Perry, & Morley (2006), a new scale – the Saint Louis University Mental Status (SLUMS) – was tested and validated in an attempt to bridge this gap. An elderly population (mean age, 75.3, SD, 5.5) was divided into three groups: normal cognitive functioning, mild neurocognitive functioning, and dementia. Both groups were assessed using the MMSE and SLUMS scales and it was found that while both were equally sensitive for identifying those individuals with dementia the SLUMS was superior when identifying individuals in the mild neurocognitive disorder group.

Psychometrics: 

Test reliability and validity data are presented in Tariq, Tumosa, Chibnall, Perry, & Morley (2006).

Files: 

PDF iconThe Saint Louis University Mental Status (SLUMS)

Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 

https://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.290

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

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