The Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ)

By

Author of Tool: 

Meyer, T. J., Miller, M. L., Metzger, R. L., & Borkovec, T. D.

Key references: 

Original article:
Meyer, T. J., Miller, M. L., Metzger, R. L., & Borkovec, T. D. (1990). Development and validation of the penn state worry questionnaire. Behavior Research and Therapy, 28, 487-495.

Brown, T.A. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire: Multiple factors or method effects? Behavior Research and Therapy (2003) 41, 1411-14226.

Fresco, D.M., et. al. ( 2003) Using the Penn State Worry Questionnaire to identify individuals with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: a receiver operating characteristic analysis. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry. 34, 283-291.

Gillis, M.M., Haaga, D.A. and Ford, G.T. (1995) Normative values for the Beck Anxiety Inventory, Fear Questionnaire, Penn State Worry Questionnaire, and Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory. Psychological Assessment, 7, 450-455.

Primary use / Purpose: 

The Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) is a 16-item questionnaire that aims to measure the trait of worry, using Likert rating from 1 (not at all typical of me) to 5 (very typical of me). Research suggests that the instrument has a strong ability to differentiate patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) from other anxiety disorders.

Background: 

Worry is regarded as a dominant feature of GAD. Since its development in 1990, the PSWQ has become a widely used self-report tool for pathological worry and GAD. The PSWQ attempts to measure the excessiveness, generality, and uncontrollable dimensions of worry.

Psychometrics: 

The PSWQ has shown to possess high internal consistency and good test-retest reliability (Meyer et al., 1990).

Keywords: 

Files: 

PDF iconPSWQ_Questionnaire

Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 

https://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.158

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

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