The Masculine and Feminine Self-Disclosure Scale (MFSDS)

Author of Tool: 

Snell, W. E., Jr.

Key references: 

 Snell, W. E., Jr. (1989).  Willingness to self-disclose to female and male friends as a function of social anxiety and gender. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 15, 113-125.
 
Snell, W. E., Jr., Belk, S. S., Flowers, A., & Warren, J. (1988).  Women's and men's willingness to self- disclose to therapists and friends:  The moderating influence of instrumental, expressive, masculine, and feminine topics. Sex Roles, 18, 769-776.
 
Snell, W. E., Jr., Belk, S. S., & Hawkins, R. C. II (1986).  The Masculine and Feminine Self-Disclosure Scale:  The politics of masculine and feminine self-presentation. Sex Roles, 15, 249-267.

Primary use / Purpose: 

The scale was devised to examine women's and men's willingness to disclose information about the “masculine” and “feminine” aspects of themselves.

Background: 

The research literature on self-disclosure is not consistent with gender stereotypes. While some studies demonstrate that women are more self-revealing than men, some find the opposite to be the case. The Masculine and Feminine Self-Disclosure Scale (MFSDS) has four separate subscales: two masculine scales assess the tendency to discuss agentic, instrumental traits and behaviors; and two feminine scales measure the tendency to self-disclose about communal, expressive traits and behaviors. 

Psychometrics: 

For psychometrics, see article Snell, W. E., Jr. (1989).  Willingness to self-disclose to female and male friends as a function of social anxiety and gender. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 15, 113-125.

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