Affect Intensity Measure (AIM) (Long and Short Form)

By

Author of Tool: 

Larsen, R. J.

Key references: 

Larsen, R. J. (1984). Theory and measurement of affect intensity as an individual difference characteristic. Dissertation Abstracts International, 85, 2297B. (University Microfilms No. 84-22112)

Larsen, R. J. (2009). Affect Intensity. In M. R. Leary & R. H. Hoyle (Eds.), Handbook of individual differences in social behavior (pp. 241-254). New York: The Guilford Press.

Larsen, R. J., Diener, E., & Emmons, R. A. (1986). Affect intensity and reactions to daily life events. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 51, 803-814.

Larsen, R. J., & Diener, E. (1987). Affect intensity as an individual difference characteristic: A review. Journal of Research in Personality, 21, 1-39.

Primary use / Purpose: 

The Affect Intensity Measure (AIM) is designed to measure the characteristic strength or weakness with which one experiences emotion.

Background: 

The Affect Intensity Measure (AIM) examines emotional reactions to typical life events. It typically contains 40 items, although a 20 item short-form of the measure is available, rated on six point scale from Never to Almost Always. The AIM gives an indication of how strongly or weakly an individual tends to experience emotions in their everyday life.

Keywords: 

Web link to tool: 

AIM (40 item)AIM (20 item)

Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 

https://dx.doi.org/10.13072/midss.104

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Welcome to the Measurement Instrument Database for the Social Sciences (MIDSS). The site is designed to be a repository for instruments that are used to collect data from across the social sciences. Please use the site to discover instruments you can use in you own research.