Quality of Life

Logo-Test-R

Unlike most other instruments developed to assess meaning/purpose in life (e.g. Purpose in Life Test, Meaning in Life Questionnaire), the Logo-Test-R does not attempt to directly assess meaning in life by explicit statements about meaningfulness (e.g., I understand my life's meaning) or the lack of it (e.g., My personal existence is utterly meaningless, without purpose). Rather, the Logo-Test-R includes factors contributing to a sense of meaning and symptoms resulting from its absence or weakness.

Author of Tool: 

Konkolÿ Thege, Barna (revised version) / Lukas, Elisabeth (original Logo-Test)

Multiple Sclerosis Self-Management Scale-Revised (MSSM-R)

In the development of the Multiple Sclerosis Self-Management Scale-Revised (MSSM-R) we have attempted to create an instrument that addresses both the multidimensional nature of self-management in general, and those aspects of self-management that may be specific to the experience of persons with MS. Recent definitions of self-management consistently highlight its multidimensional nature. Among the most frequently identified dimensions, which we have incorporated in the MSSM-R, are:
(1) Understanding one’s condition and participating in learning about MS;

Author of Tool: 

Malachy Bishop & Michael Frain

Goal Adjustment Scale--(GAS)

People cannot always attain their goals. For example, sociostructural, biological, and normative factors can reduce the opportunities for goal attainment as people advance in age (Heckhausen & Schulz, 1995). Biologically and socially determined rules govern when people should retire, and there are implicit age norms guiding important life transitions (Baltes, Cornelius, & Nesselroade, 1979; Neugarten, 1969).

Author of Tool: 

Wrosch, C., Scheier, M. F., Miller, G. E., Schulz, R., & Carver, C. S.

Life Engagement Test (LET)

Recent models of behavioral self-regulation (Carver and Scheier, 1981, 1990, 1998), themselves descendents of generations of expectancyvalue models of motivation (Atkinson, 1964; Vroom, 1964; Feather, 1982; Shah and Higgins, 1997), suggest that two elements are important in creating behavior: (a) the ability to identify goals that are valued and (b) the perception that those goals are attainable. Of these two elements, it is the value dimension that is of interest here. Valued goals are important because they provide a purpose for living.

Author of Tool: 

Scheier, M. F., Wrosch, C., Baum, A., Cohen, S., Martire, L. M., Matthews, K. A., Schulz, R., & Zdaniuk, B.

Negative Event (hassle) Scale for Middle Aged Adults (frequency and severity)

Maybery and colleagues initially highlighted face and content validity problems with hassle measurement generally and then demonstrated predictive validity improvements to the Lazarus hassle scale by adding a substantial range of interpersonal events (Maybery & Graham, 2001). In developing a new hassle measure for University students, a coherent, valid, and reliable component subscale structure was highlighted that included a number of interpersonal subscales (Maybery, 2003a).

Author of Tool: 

Maybery, D. J.

Negative Event (hassle) Scale for University Students

Over the years hassle and uplift measurement has received considerable criticism. It has been suggested that the hassle scales of Kanner and Delongis are perhaps flawed because they confound frequency of event occurrence and severity information in each item Hassle items on the Kanner scale are also thought contaminated with outcome measures of stress.4 Others have suggested that items on these scales are not representative of a broad range of population subgroups (being designed for a middle-aged population).

Author of Tool: 

Maybery, D. J.

Positive Event (uplift) Scale for University Students

Up until the 1980’s, event measurement was characterised by important life events such as marriages, accidents and deaths (e.g., Holmes and Rahe, 1967). At that time, Lazarus and colleagues highlighted daily events (hassles) as better predictors of negative psychological and somatic outcomes than major life events (Kanner et al., 1981). Daily events are theoretically embedded within the cognitive transactual model of stress.

Author of Tool: 

Mayberry, D. J.
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