Mate Attraction Tactics

Author of Tool: 

Buss, D.

Key references: 

Buss, D. M. (1988). The Evolution of Human Intrasexual Competition: Tactics of Mate Attraction. Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, 54, 616-628. 
 
Schmitt, D. P., & Buss, D. M. (1996). Mate attraction and competitor derogation: Context effects on perceived effectiveness. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 70, 1185-1204.
 
Bleske-Rechek, A., & Buss, D.M. (2006). Sexual strategies pursued and mate attraction tactics deployed. Personality and Individual Differences, 40, 1299-1311.

Primary use / Purpose: 

Assesses tactics of intrasexual mate competition relating to four evolution-based hypotheses.

Background: 

Darwin's theory of sexual selection suggests that individuals compete with members of their own sex for reproductively relevant resources held by members of the opposite sex. The premise behind the creation of the mate attraction tactics instrument was the fact that despite its centrality to evolutionary theory, little systematic empirical work had been conducted on the ways in which humans compete for reproductively relevant resources. Tactics of Mate Attraction assesses self-reported tactics of mate attraction. This instrument is concerned with the things that you did when you first met your current spouse and while you were dating him or her. Specifically, it is interested in the things you did to make yourself more attractive to him or her. On the rating scale next to each act listed below, you are asked to circle the word that best describes the frequency with which you performed each act when you first met your spouse and while you were dating.

Psychometrics: 

For psychometric information see article:

Buss, D. M. (1988). The Evolution of Human Intrasexual Competition: Tactics of Mate Attraction. Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, 54, 616-628. 

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