Gratitude Resentment and Appreciation Test (GRAT) (Revised GRAT and Short Form GRAT)

Author of Tool: 

Watkins, P. C., Woodward, K., Stone, T., & Kolts, R. L.

Key references: 

Watkins, P. C., Woodward, K., Stone, T., & Kolts, R. L. (2003). Gratitude and happiness: Development of a measure of gratitude, and relationship with subjective well-being. Social Behavior & Personality: An International Journal, 31, 431-452.

Primary use / Purpose: 

The GRAT was designed to measure an individual's dispositional gratitude.

Background: 

The authors proposed several traits that that a grateful person would exhibit. A grateful person would not feel deprived in life, they would have a sense of abundance. They would acknowledge the contribution of others to their success and well-being, would appreciate life's simple pleasures, and would acknowledge the importance of experiencing and expressing gratitude. Their conceptualisation of gratitude was shown to correlate with measures of subjective well-being and positive affect.

The revised Gratitude Resentment and Appreciation Test (GRAT) consists of 44 items measuring these characteristics. The short-form GRAT consists of 16 items. Both scales are rated on a nine point scale from I strongly disagree to I strongly agree with the statement.

Psychometrics: 

The revised GRAT has been shown to have good internal consistency, factorial validity, construct validity, and temporal stability (Watkins et al., 2003)

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